He doesn’t have any eyes and his owners still abandoned him in the streets, weeks and he is still there

If you have done any reading at all about health and fitness, you know one thing: body fat matters, body weight doesn't. While the two do typically go hand in hand, there are always people who have high body weight and appear overweight but have a high level of muscle mass and are in fact, exceptionally lean.

If you are attempting to lose weight, it is best to measure whether you are losing fat or losing body weight. Body weight can be a mixture of fat and lean muscle mass tissue, which is less than ideal.

As you strive to improve your health, you only want to be losing body fat. So this now begs the question, should you invest in a body fat scale? It would seem to be the best solution. This way you can monitor which way your body fat levels are going. Before you run out and buy the first body fat scale you see, however, you do need to keep one thing in mind: not all scales are accurate.

Here is what to keep in mind.

Methods Of Measuring Body Fat Levels. There are many methods of measuring your body fat levels...

1. One approach is to pinch various areas of your body and determine how thick those areas are. The thicker the pinch, the more body fat: this is referred to as a skin caliper reading.

2. Another method is to put yourself through an electronic scanner, dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA previously referred to as DEXA), which will determine bone density, fat mass, and lean muscle mass tissue. This is the most accurate method. However, you cannot do it yourself, and it can be costly to have performed.

3. The third method is to use what is known as bio-electrical impedance, which is where an electrical current is sent through your body, and the speed of travel is determined. The current will not travel fast through fat mass, so the slower it is, the more fat you are said to have.

The bio-electrical impedance method seems ideal in theory, but the problem is your hydration levels can throw it off. If you are dehydrated, you will appear much "fatter" than if you are hydrated. This method is the one most home scales go by. While it is beneficial to be able to check your reading conveniently, it is not an accurate one. You can follow the current trend and use one of these home scales but remember you need to be at the same level of hydration at all times. Measuring your levels first thing every morning can help out with your hydration levels being similar.

Getting your body fat checked by a DXA scanner a few times a year and relying on how your clothes look and feel, could be a better approach.

Numerous studies show that if you give people the same diet and make the follow the same exercise regime, the ones who are sleep-deprived (sleeping 5.5 hours or less a day) lose about 55% less body fat compared to the ones who sleep at least 8 hours a day. Imagine this - you can actually burn more fat just by sleeping more. How is that possible at all? Read on to find out.

There are at least three factors that facilitate the fat burning process in good sleepers.

First of all, it is well known that you produce the greatest amount of human growth hormone at night, but only if you are asleep (and moreover, primarily if you are asleep between 10am and 2am!). This hormone, notorious for its antianging function, not only helps you build muscle tissue but it also protects your muscles. And, as may have already heard, the more muscle the body carries, the more fat it burns.

Secondly, when you are sleep-deprived (and applies especially if you are awake between 10pm and 2am), your body produces excess amounts of cortisol, at the wrong time. Cortisol is a stress hormone and it triggers a process that burns muscle tissue, slows down metabolism and encourages fat storage. In other words, cortisol sets off the breakdown of your proteins and their subsequent conversion into fat. So you really want to be sleeping at night to avoid excess cortisol production at the wrong time. (NB: You do need cortisol, of course, but early in the morning so you can have energy to move around).

And last but not least, when you sleep well at night, your body produces melatonin which, as indicated in a recent study published in The Journal of Pineal Research, is a powerful fat burner. Melatonin is another hormone, and it practically increases your brown adipose tissue (i.e. good fat) which functions similar to your muscle tissue in that it burns white adipose tissue (i.e. bad fat). In effect, melatonin helps increase your metabolic rate. In addition, melatonin has been recognized as a powerful anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory agent. But you can only produce it at night and only if you are asleep!

He doesn’t have any eyes and his owners still abandoned him in the streets. Blind unable to protect himself! He scavenges for food and a place to sleep. Through it all this boy cannot stop smiling hoping someone takes him home!

It’s been weeks and he is still there, struggling to survive! He desperately needs a rescue and a foster! He is in Peru but can be flown to the states if anyone wants him!

Fidonation, if you or someone you know is interested in giving him the forever family he rightfully deserves, please contact Leslie Hennings.

Additionally, please share this story on Facebook or Twitter so we are closer to finding him a forever family. We have done it before, and can certainly do it again.
We come across some people who don't gain weight even though they eat whatever they feel like. At the other extreme, there are people, who seem to gain weight no matter how little they eat. Consequently, some remain thin without efforts whereas others struggle hard to avoid gaining weight.

Essentially, our weight depends on the number of calories we consume - how many of those calories we store and how many we burn up. But each of these is influenced by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. The interplay between all these factors begins at the moment of our conception and continues throughout our life.

If we consume more energy (calories) than we expend, we will gain weight. Excess calories are stored throughout our body as fat. Our body stores the fat within specialized fat cells (adipose tissue), which are always present in the body, either by enlarging them or by creating more of them.

In order to lose weight, one would have to create a calorie deficit. A good weekly goal is to lose ½ to 2 pounds per week or approximately 1% body fat every two weeks. The number of calories one eats to accomplish this needs to be approximately 250 to 1000 calories less than one's daily calorie burn. We can do it by increasing daily activities with more daily steps or other non-exercise activities. Standing and pacing burns at least 2-3 times more calories than sitting for the same time period. A deficit of 250 to 1000 calories can also be created by increasing workout time or intensity and by decreasing the food intake of approximately 200 to 300 calories per day.

In spite of our sincere efforts at losing weight, we at times don't succeed due to specific reasons that stand in our way without we even realizing them.

Reasons for not losing weight -

• Lack of sleep - Lack of sleep can contribute to weight gain. The experts speculate that sleep deprivation may affect the secretion of cortisol, one of the hormones that regulate appetite. When we're tired due to lack of sleep, we may skip exercise or simply move around less, which means burning fewer calories.

• Chronic stress - Stress and weight gain go hand in hand though some of us not aware of this fact. Chronic stress increases the production of cortisol, which not only increases appetite but it can also cause extra fat storage around the abdomen. It causes cravings for foods, which are high in sugar and fat. The so-called comfort foods make us feel better. In addition, we skip workouts because we just feel too stressed out to exercise.

• Overeating - The researchers have found that most of us underestimate how much we're eating, especially when we eat out. Careful scrutiny of our diet is the only way to know how much we're really eating. We need to space out our meals in such a way that we don't remain hungry for long. Or else we may overeat at our next meal. We should try eating smaller portions and eat more often.

• Exercise - Exercise is another crucial element of weight loss, along with our daily activity levels. If we are not losing weight, we either need to increase our workout time and intensity to match our weight loss goals or need to change our weight loss goals to match what we're actually doing. In order to lose weight, we need to build lean muscle by doing some form of strength training in addition to our cardio. The more muscles our body has, the more fat we'll burn.

• Sedentary habits - Any extended sitting such as at a desk, behind a wheel or in front of a screen can be harmful. In addition to exercise, we must try to be as active as we can. We must also limit our screen time. Therefore, we must take a break from sitting every 30 minutes. If we spend more than 8 hours sitting, it could be one more reason we're having trouble losing weight.

• Weekend indulgences - Having some treats now and then is fine but indulging mindlessly in treats on weekends will hurt our weight loss goals. The trick is to plan our indulgences so that we can have some fun while staying on track with our weight loss goals.

• Unrealistic goals - There are many factors that affect weight loss which again can't always be measured or accounted for with the tools we have. Our body may be making changes that can't yet be measured with a scale or a tape measure. The experts agree that a realistic weight loss goal is to focus on losing about 0.5 to 2 pounds a week. For any more than that, we would have to cut our calories so low that it may not be sustainable. Conversely, we may be losing inches even if we are not losing weight. If we're not getting the results we expect, it's crucial to find out if it's because we're expecting something from our body, which it just can't deliver.

• Plateaus - Almost everyone reaches a weight loss plateau at some point. As our body adapts to our workouts, it becomes more efficient at it and, therefore, doesn't expend as many calories doing it. Some common reasons for this include doing the same workouts daily, not eating enough calories and overtraining. We can avoid plateaus by trying something completely different at least once a week and by changing our frequency, intensity, duration, and type of workout.

• A medical condition - This is especially important if we're doing everything right and haven't seen any changes at all on the scale or our body after several months. There may be a health problem or some common medications thwarting our efforts at weight loss. One must consult one's doctor to rule out such a possibility.

The bottom line -

There are endless diets, supplements, and meal replacement plans claiming to ensure rapid weight loss that we come across in the media. But most of them lack scientific evidence. In fact, many gullible persons fall prey to them and some have to face their harmful side-effects too. However, a good understanding of the reasons that thwart our efforts would positively impact our weight loss program.

3 Responses to "He doesn’t have any eyes and his owners still abandoned him in the streets, weeks and he is still there"

  1. EXTREMELY URGENT! Blind dog that doesn't have any eyes has been abandoned and left out on the streets all alone in Puru! Please help this dog by adopting fostering rescuing him asap! He can be flown back to the usa critical timing SOS

    ReplyDelete

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